Neil Patrick Harris talks hosting the Emmys and how TV has changed

Neil Patrick Harris is hosting the Emmys again after previously taking on the job in 2009. Neil Patrick Harris is also starring in the final season of the sitcom 'How I Met Your Mother' this year.

Zach Cordner/Invision/AP
Neil Patrick Harris is hosting the 2013 Emmys.

Neil Patrick Harris, host of the Emmy awards for excellence in the TV industry, said he doesn't feel like he has to prove himself after previously hosting the Emmy and Tony Awards.

"There's a lot of awards, so I thankfully don't have to do a lot of work," he said. "I get to come up with some funny one-liners."

For the sixth year, the show will be held at the Nokia Theatre in downtown Los Angeles. The massive red carpet — more like a red sidewalk, really — will canvass the entire plaza across the street from the Staples Center for Sunday's TV extravaganza on CBS.

Harris said he's interested to see how programming from Netflix and other online streaming services will fare at the ceremony and beyond.

"I think it's really interesting to see how that's going to shape the way we watch television," said Harris. "It questions commercials. It questions programming. They were worried it would flop. I got to do 'Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog,' which is kind of like the first one of those, so I have a vested interest in those doing well."

Inside the Nokia Theatre, stagehands were hard at work on preparing the set. The stage has been outfitted with six cubes that pivot up and down and serve as video screens.

Place cards on the chairs in front of the stage's zebrawood stairs show that Jane Lynch and "Modern Family" stars Ty Burrell and Sofia Vergara are front-row center. Other nominees with front-row spots included Jim Parsons, Connie Britton, Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright.

Many of the seating arrangements in different parts of the orchestra section featured unique pairings: Michael J. Fox aside Elton John, Matt Damon next to Amy Poehler and Dylan McDermott alongside Bob Newhart.

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