Changing the Cybersecurity Paradigm: Disposable Cyber Systems

How can we make the cyber world more resilient, even in the times of breaches like those at JP Morgan and Home Depot? Vern Boyle, Director of Technology, Northrop Grumman looks at how to flip the cybersecurity advantage from the attacker to the defender.

Cyber attacks have become a common part of our everyday lives.  Almost every week, another high profile breach is reported. These attacks affect military systems, critical infrastructure, and financial/retail institutions alike.

Vern Boyle, director of technology at Northrop Grumman Information Systems, explores how to flip the advantage from the attacker to the defender in this TED-style talk titled “Changing the Paradigm, Disposable Cyber Systems.”

In this talk, delivered on Oct. 9, 2014 at a cybersecurity event in Washington, D.C. focused on the cyber workforce, Mr. Boyle discusses plans to transform systems from inherently vulnerable to inherently resilient and introduce the concept of “disposable systems” as a new way of operating through these pervasive cyber attacks.

Vern discussed the three technology enablers that make this concept possible: cloud computing, software defined networking, and increasingly mobile endpoints.

Beyond these three building blocks, there are three other lower-level enablers. These are root of trust, strong identity, and always-on encryption.  These lower level enablers in combination with the three bigger architectural elements are the key ingredients to making disposable systems a reality.

The outcome is inherently resilient cyber systems.  These new systems transform man versus machine into machine versus machine, making inherently vulnerable stationary targets into inherently resilient moving ones.

Northrop Grumman is a global security company providing innovative systems, products and solutions in unmanned systems, cyber, C4ISR and logistics and modernization to government and commercial customers worldwide.

For more, visit www.northropgrumman.com/cyber.

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