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Meanwhile in ... Australia, there’s talk about putting rhinos in the outback

And in Iraq, a growing number of women are believed to be divorcing their Islamic State (ISIS) husbands. 

Mark Baker/Reuters
Rhinos in an Australian zoo

Australia, there’s talk about putting rhinos in the outback. It may sound strange but in some ways it makes perfect sense. According to the Australian Rhino Project, since 2010, “6,925 rhinos have been poached in South Africa. With an estimated remaining population of less than 20,000 [southern] white rhinos, the species is becoming increasingly threatened due to poaching.” Australia has a climate and terrain that would suit the needs of rhinos, in addition to having well-enforced
anti-poaching laws. The rhinos would not run free but would be managed in large enclosed areas, perhaps becoming a major attraction for ecotourists. 

Iraq, a growing number of women are believed to be divorcing their Islamic State (ISIS) husbands. Deputy Justice Minister Hussein Jassem told NBC that there has been “a huge increase” in requests for divorce in recent months across Iraq, mostly filed by women, and particularly in regions such as Anbar and Nineveh where ISIS was strong. Umaima, who is seeking a divorce from an ISIS fighter, told NBC, “Being the wife of a terrorist is not honoring me or my family and it is not going to honor my kids.”  

Bolivia, officials are moving forward with plans to build a museum at the bottom of a lake. Lake Titicaca, which straddles the border of Bolivia and Peru and covers more than 3,000 miles, is considered sacred by some local cultures. Ten thousand artifacts with connections to at least three ancient local cultures have recently been discovered at the bottom of the lake, reports phys.org, spurring plans to build a museum that would also serve as a research center. The museum, projected to cost $10 million, is to be built in partnership with Belgian development agency Enabel. 

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