Six dead, suspect on loose in Pennsylvania shooting spree

Pennsylvania police swarmed from one community to another Monday as they searched for shooting suspect Bradley William Stone, who allegedly shot six people, authorities said, including his ex-wife.

A man went to three houses in the Philadelphia suburbs before dawn Monday and fatally shot six people, authorities said, including his recently engaged ex-wife, who had told neighbors she feared he would kill her.

Police swarmed from one community to another Monday as they searched for Bradley William Stone, 35. As darkness fell, police were still surrounding his home, where he was believed to be holed up. They used a bullhorn and loud explosions to try to compel his surrender.

"Bradley, this is the police department!" officers yelled. "Come to the front door with your hands up. You're under arrest."

The rampage started at ex-wife Nicole Stone's apartment, investigators said. Stone broke in through a glass door around 4 a.m., firing multiple rounds, the woman's neighbors said.

The neighbors said Stone fled with their two children. Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri later said the two children were safe.

Stone then went to two nearby communities, where her relatives lived, killed five other people and severely wounded another person before apparently holing up in a home, authorities said.

"She would tell anybody who would listen that he was going to kill her, and that she was really afraid for her life," said Evan Weron, a neighbor of Stone's ex-wife.

Stone had a "familial relationship" to all the victims, Ferman said.

Stone was likely wearing military fatigues and was known to use a cane or walker, Ferman said.

The shootings occurred at homes in three different communities within a few miles of each other.

Several school districts ordered students and teachers to shelter in place.

Brad and Nicole Stone married in 2004 and filed for divorce in March 2009, according to court records.

Brad Stone remarried last year, according to records. She became engaged over the summer, neighbors said.

The former couple recently sparred over custody of their two children, with Brad Stone filing an emergency petition Dec. 5 and Nicole Stone responding with a counterclaim Dec. 9, according to court records. The outcome of their dispute was not clear.

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Dale reported from Harleysville, Pennsylvania. Associated Press writer Kathy Matheson also contributed to this story.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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