Winter tires and snowblowers make early appearance in Northeast

Tired of winter already? Snowy weather complicated travel and Christmas shopping for much of the country this weekend. Some parts of Pennsylvania saw nearly a foot of snow Saturday, while Boston got four to eight inches.  

Nam Y. Huh/AP
Marius Daugirdas skis on the sidewalk on Saturday, in Evanston, Ill. Snow continued to fall over the Chicago area into northwest Indiana, as a winter storm moved east, dumping several inches of snow throughout the Northeast.

At this rate, the Northeast will be tired of winter before winter even arrives.

Another shot of wintry weather moved through Ohio and Pennsylvania on Saturday as it headed into New England, hampering travel by car and airplane and complicating shoppers' plans less than two weeks before Christmas.

Nearly a foot of snow was reported in parts of central Pennsylvania late Saturday as the sprawling storm moved into New England, where the National Weather Service warned Maine could see near-blizzard conditions Sunday due to heavy snow and strong winds before the storm moves out.

Six to 12 inches of snow was expected in parts of Massachusetts, followed by sleet and freezing rain after daybreak. Four to 8 inches was possible in Boston.

Multiple accidents were reported on roadways throughout the Midwest and Northeast, while airports reported about 1,000 flight cancelations because of Saturday's snow — a third round of wintry weather in a seven-day span, with a week still to go before winter's official arrival.

Double-digit snow totals were reported Saturday in parts of northern Pennsylvania and southern New York, while New York City's Central Park got 5 inches. Parts of Connecticut got more than half a foot.

Six days after another storm had buried Lincoln Financial Field under several inches of snow for a Philadelphia Eagles game, the Army-Navy game was played Saturday on the same field — although in less snowy conditions.

Accountant Kathy Porter shivered under layers of clothing in the stands, trying to keep warm amid low temperatures she doesn't get much of back home in Charlotte, N.C.

But snow was preferable to rain, Porter said. She was "a little frozen but OK," she said.

Snow was also welcome news at resorts and ski towns in Northern New England.

"We have been watching (the forecast) since people first started talking about it on Monday or Tuesday," said Ethan Austin, spokesman for the Sugarloaf Ski Resort in Carrabassett Valley, Maine. "We're pretty psyched."

The snow-dampened shopping weekend in mid-December was not such good news for retailers.

Kathy Grannis, a spokeswoman for the National Retail Federation, said consumers would likely take their shopping online. She said the weekend before Christmas will give retailers and shoppers another bite at the apple.

"If a big storm hits around the 21st, 22nd, it will be a completely different story," Grannis said.

The weather contributed to four deadly crashes on Missouri roads on Friday and Saturday and drivers in states throughout the path of the storm were warned of slick road conditions from snow and ice.

Snow fell at up to 2 inches per hour in northern Pennsylvania late in the afternoon, while the storm seemed to be skipping other areas entirely.

National Weather Service meteorologist Elyse Colbert said snow had reached more than 3 inches in State College by dinnertime Saturday and provided a lovely winterscene.

"Unless you have to drive in it," she said.

Associated Press writer Christopher S. Rugaber in Washington, D.C., and Lisa Rathke in Montpelier, Vt., contributed to this report.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.

QR Code to Winter tires and snowblowers make early appearance in Northeast
Read this article in
https://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Latest-News-Wires/2013/1215/Winter-tires-and-snowblowers-make-early-appearance-in-Northeast
QR Code to Subscription page
Start your subscription today
https://www.csmonitor.com/subscribe