American, National League starters named for MLB All-Star Game

Matt Harvey of the host New York Mets will be the starting pitcher for the NL, while Detroit's Max Scherzer will start for the AL Tuesday night.

Carlos Osorio/AP
Detroit Tigers starting pitcher Max Scherzer throws during the first inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers in Detroit, Saturday, July 13, 2013.

Mets ace Matt Harvey will start Tuesday night's All-Star game on his home mound at New York's Citi Field, and the Detroit Tigers' Max Scherzer will open for the American League.

Harvey will be the first pitcher from the host team to start an All-Star game since Houston's Roger Clemens in 2004 and just the 11th overall.

NL manager Bruce Bochy's starting lineup announced Monday has Cincinnati second baseman Brandon Phillips leading off, followed by St. Louis right fielder Carlos Beltran, Reds first baseman Joey Votto, Mets third baseman David Wright, Colorado left fielder Carlos Gonzalez, Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina, Rockies shortstop Troy Tulowitzki, Colorado designated hitter Michael Cuddyer and Washington center fielder Bryce Harper.

AL manager Jim Leyland has the Los Angeles Angels' Mike Trout in left field and leading off, followed by New York Yankees second baseman Robinson Cano, Detroit third baseman Miguel Cabrera, Baltimore first baseman Chris Davis, Toronto right fielder Jose Bautista, Boston designated hitter David Ortiz, Orioles center fielder Adam Jones, Minnesota catcher Joe Mauer and Baltimore shortstop J.J. Hardy.

The 24-year-old Harvey, 7-2 with a 2.35 ERA and an NL-high 147 strikeouts, will become the youngest All-Star starting pitcher since the Mets' Dwight Gooden in 1988, when he was 23.

Detroit's Justin Verlander was the AL starter and loser last year. Scherzer (13-1, 3.10 ERA) joins him to become the first pitchers from the same club to start consecutive All-Star games since Arizona's Randy Johnson (2000-01) and Curt Schilling (2002).

Scherzer was 13-0 before losing Saturday to Texas. He had most wins in a perfect start since Clemens won his first 14 decisions in 1986.

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