Reuters/File
Angus (l.) and Malcolm (r.) Young, founder members of Australian heavy metal band AC/DC, flank Jose Luis Perez, mayor of the Madrid district of Leganes, following the inauguration of a new street with the group's name in this 2000 photo. AC/DC guitarist Malcolm Young will take a leave from the Australian hard rock group he founded because of ill health, the band said in a statement on Wednesday.

AC/DC news surprises fans, Malcolm Young taking a break to focus on health

AC/DC news announcements were posted on the band's Facebook page saying the 61-year-old guitarist is in ill health.

Malcolm Young is taking a break from AC/DC to focus on his health, the band said.

The announcement saying the 61-year-old guitarist is in "ill health" was posted on the band's Facebook. No details were provided.

"Malcolm would like to thank the group's die-hard legions of fans worldwide for their never-ending love and support," the statement said.

AC/DC includes vocalist Brian Johnson, drummer Phil Rudd, bassist Cliff Williams and guitarist Angus Young, Malcolm Young's brother.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Famers said in the statement they "will continue to make music." AC/DC's last studio album was 2008's "Black Ice." They released a live disc in 2012.

Young co-founded the Australian classic rock band. He has performed with AC/DC for 40 years.

Mark Gable, a friend and musical contemporary of Young, said he doubted the guitarist would ever record again.

"It's not just that he is unwell, it's that it is quite serious," Gable, frontman of the Australian band The Choirboys, told Australian Broadcasting Corp. radio.

"He will probably not be able to record," Gable added.

Sydney-based music company Alberts, which launched AC/DC's international career and manages the band's music catalogue, did not respond to a request for comment.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.

QR Code to AC/DC news surprises fans, Malcolm Young taking a break to focus on health
Read this article in
https://www.csmonitor.com/The-Culture/Latest-News-Wires/2014/0417/AC-DC-news-surprises-fans-Malcolm-Young-taking-a-break-to-focus-on-health
QR Code to Subscription page
Start your subscription today
https://www.csmonitor.com/subscribe