Miley Cyrus loses Vogue cover, gains SNL appearance

Miley Cyrus lost a planned cover story in Vogue after her MTV Video Music Awards performance. But Miley Cyrus gained a Saturday Night Live hosting spot.

After Miley Cyrus’ twerking, Vogue editor Anna Wintour had done some jerking – scotching plans for the 20-year-old pop star to appear on the magazine’s cover in December.

Her steamy performance at last month’s MTV Video Music Awards, at which Cyrus suggestively cavorted in a flesh-colored bikini with giant teddy bears, a huge foam finger and Robin Thicke, set off a media storm with most seeing the former Disney teen star’s dance as over-the-top.

Count Wintour among the critics, according to media reports.

“Anna found the whole thing distasteful,” it quoted one source as saying. “She decided, based on Miley’s performance, to take the cover in a different direction.”

A spokesman for Conde Naste, Vogue’s parent company, declined comment to TheWrap on Sunday.

Meanwhile, Miley Cyrus will be making a return trip to host SNL.

When “Saturday Night Live” returns for its 39th season on Sep. 28, alum Tina Fey will perform the monolgue, hosting the show that made her famous for her fourth time since her departure.

The following week, Miley Cyrus returns to “SNL” as both host and musical guest. Her new album “Bangerz” will be released three days later.

On Oct. 12, Bruce Willis will return to Studio 8H to host the comedy show for the second time. Katy Perry joins him as musical guest, also making her second appearance.

Teaming up with Fey for the kick off episode, Arcade Fire makes its fourth appearance as musical guest.

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