Super Bowl halftime show headlined by Bruno Mars

Bruno Mars, a singer-songwriter known for pop hits like 'When I Was Your Man,' and 'Locked Out of Heaven,' will perform at the 2014 Super Bowl halftime show Feb. 2 at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J.

Eric Thayer/Reuters/File
Bruno Mars performs during the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards in New York August 25. According to news reports Mars will perform at this season's Super Bowl set for February 2, 2014 at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J.

Grammy-winner Bruno Mars will sing at halftime of the Super Bowl in February, a person familiar with the NFL's entertainment plans told the Associated Press on Saturday.

The person spoke on condition of anonymity because no announcement had been made. The official word is expected to come at an event in New York's Times Square on Sunday.

The NFL's regular season began Thursday, and the first full slate of games is Sunday.

The Super Bowl will be played Feb. 2 at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. Halftime shows have drawn more than 100 million television viewers in the United States alone in past years.

Beyonce was the star of this year's Super Bowl halftime show in February in New Orleans, where the Baltimore Ravens beat the San Francisco 49ers 34-31.

Some recent halftime performers at the NFL's championship game were Madonna in 2012, The Black Eyed Peas with Usher and Slash in 2011, The Who in 2010, and Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band in 2009.

Mars is one of pop music's top acts, with several No. 1 hits, including his most recent, "When I Was Your Man."

The 27-year-old singer-songwriter-producer was honored for best male video and choreography for "Treasure" at the MTV Video Music Awards last month.

Mars, who was born Peter Hernandez, released his platinum-selling debut, "Doo-Wops & Hooligans," in 2010, and released his second album, "Unorthodox Jukebox," last year. His hits include "Locked Out of Heaven," ''Just the Way You Are" and "Grenade."

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