Laura Ingraham goes off the air – to pursue modern dance?

Laura Ingraham, a conservative talk radio host, has left the Talk Radio Network after 9 years. Laura Ingraham jokes that she plans to pursue modern dance and the xylophone. If those don't work out, she'll go back to radio.

REUTERS/Toby Melville/File
Conservative talk show host Laura Ingraham has left her syndicated show. But is expected to be back soon on another radio network.

 Radio talk show host Laura Ingraham is off the air — at least temporarily.

She said Tuesday that she's leaving her distributor, Talk Radio Network, after more than nine years because her contract is up. Ingraham said she is in discussions with other distributors about her show, which currently airs on 325 stations nationally.

On her website, Ingraham wrote:

"After more than 9 years with the distributor Talk Radio Network, I decided it was time to move on. After much thought and reflection, I have decided to pursue my first loves--modern dance and the xylophone. In the highly unlikely event that these efforts do not prove fruitful, I intend to return to radio.

Seriously--to the more than 300 stations that carry the Laura Ingraham Show and to all my loyal listeners, I feel the time is right to expand and retool my radio program and to explore other syndication options, which I am now actively pursuing. During this brief hiatus, my team and I will continue to deliver thought-provoking and entertaining analysis via my website."

Talkers magazine says the conservative Ingraham is the most-listened to woman on radio, with an estimated 5.75 million listeners a week. Talkers said that ranks her among the top eight radio hosts overall.

Talkers also says that Ingraham's departure "comes as no surprise to industry observers who have long known of the not-so-secret friction that has existed for years between Ingraham and TRN’s top management.  TALKERS has reached out to Talk Radio Network for information but has yet to receive a response."

On Tuesday, Ingraham's time slot on the Talk Radio Network was filled by Tammy Bruce. Bruce's own website describes her as "an openly gay, pro-choice, gun owning, pro-death penalty, voted-for-President Reagan progressive feminist."

In the meantime, Ingraham said she'll keep her opinions flowing on her website, on Twitter and during Fox News Channel appearances.

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Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.

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