Gluten free coconut rice pudding

Rice, coconut milk, and a few simple ingredients work wonders to make a warm, sweet pudding. Add a grate or two of lime zest if you feel like an extra zing.

In Praise of Leftovers
This simple coconut rice pudding is gluten-free and comes together with just a few pantry staples.

Today was all about Loretta. She begged for a doll and for rice pudding. She got both.

The pudding is a Tamar Adler recipe that I've made a few times before since I usually have cold rice in the fridge and coconut milk in the pantry. 

And the doll? It called for a poem.

Girl Power

Suddenly, after seven years of girlhood,
you wanted a doll.

In the toy aisle, there's Rachel, Tess,
Ashley, Star. They have horses, roller skates,
tea sets, electric guitars, and big price tags
next to your crumpled allowance.
You pick Phoebe
because her hair is long.
You're talking to her before we're home.

I forget how much love you have to give.

Now, on the living room floor, you're brushing,
humming, cooing, changing her shoes,
making her a bed. Something in me knows
this is the easiest
being a girl will ever be--
before rejection, scales, first love, 
before unraveling, tidal desires--
one suntanned, lively second grader
who wants only a doll, a Sunday afternoon,
and snacks all around.

Coconut rice pudding
I don't know how Loretta got rice pudding in her head, but she did. My kids have a one-track mind (treats!) just like their mother has a one-track mind (cheese!). Phoebe had some too, of course.  

2 cups cold cooked rice
2 cups coconut milk
1 cup heavy cream
1/3 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
Grate of nutmeg
1 teaspoon vanilla
Lime zest if you like

1. Combine all ingredients except lime zest in a heavy medium saucepan. Stir and bring to a simmer.

2.Turn to low and cook until rice has absorbed a lot of the liquid and pudding is the consistency you like. Tamar says 50 minutes – I did more like 25.

3. Once done, spoon into bowls and top with lime zest, if you like (or stewed fruit, cinnamon, and toasted nuts). Phoebe likes her's plain. 

Related post on In Praise of Leftovers: Coconut Lime Bundt Cake

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.