Cheeseburger quiche

Cheesburger quiche is the perfect family dinner. It is easy to make and has a whimsical appeal that all ages can love.

The Runaway Spoon
Use a store-bought pie crust, and you can easily brown the beef, onions, and garlic ahead of time and assemble this cheeseburger quiche right before baking.

My family ate together almost every night when I was growing up. We sat at a little table for four in the den; the table came from a restaurant that was once on the property when my grandparents bought their farm lock, stock, and barrel. My mom cooked mostly, sometimes my dad, sometimes me as I got older. Never my brother as I remember, though he is a good cook now. The meals were not always complicated, though my mom did tend to go through exotic vegetable phases and my father periods of interest in Chinese cuisine or James Beard books. But sitting at that table as a family was probably the most formative experience of my youth.

This is not, however, a dish from my childhood. But it is the perfect family dinner. It is easy to make and has a whimsical appeal that all ages can love. I take no issue with using purchased, roll-out pie crust, and you can easily brown the beef, onions and garlic, ahead of time and assemble the quiche right before baking. The shredded lettuce and tomato topper is fun, and you can make up a side salad with any extra lettuce. As I have made pretty clear, I am not a fan of pickle relish, but if your family is, stir a little into the filling or serve a dollop on top.

I asked my family if I should call this quiche or pie, and they suggested Quicheburger Pie. For clarity’s sake I stick with the original, but I will always think of it as Quicheburger now!

Cheeseburger quiche

Pastry for one 9-inch tart pan (store bought, ready roll is fine)
1 pound ground beef
1 cup finely chopped onion
2 finely minced garlic cloves
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
4 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, grated
4 eggs
1 cup milk
1 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons ketchup
1 tablespoon yellow mustard
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
shredded lettuce
diced tomato
   
1
. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Fit the pastry into a 9-inch removable bottom tart pan. Line the pastry with parchment and fill with pastry weights (or dried beans or rice) and bake for 10 minutes. Remove the paper and weights and leave the crust to cool.

2. 
Break up the meat into a large skillet and cook until it begins to brown, breaking it up into small pieces as you cook. Add the onion and cook until the meat is no longer pink and the onions are soft and translucent. Add the garlic, salt, and pepper and cook for a few more minutes. Set aside to cool. Spread the meat over the crust, then sprinkle over the grated cheese in an even layer.

3. 
Whisk the eggs, milk, mayonnaise, ketchup, mustard, and Worcestershire together in a bowl until combined and as smooth as possible (there may be some small lumps). Pour the filling over the meat and cheese in the crust. Use a fork to help some of the custard seep through the filling.

4. 
Bake the quiche for 25 – 30 minutes until the center is puffed up and firm. Let the quiche cool for a few minutes, then carefully remove the ring around the tart pan. Serve the quiche warm with the shredded lettuce and diced tomatoes on top.

Related post on The Runaway Spoon: Mustardy ham and noodle casserole

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