March bookclub selection: Chocolat by Joanne Harris

Edible Books is a monthly bookclub that participates via Twitter. The selection for March is 'Chocolat' by Joanne Harris.

During our recent Q&A with Erica Bauermeister (author of our February book selection, "The School of Essential Ingredients") she listed "Chocolat" among her favorite food books, so in a way this book was her nomination.

And as one of our book club members noted last month, "Chocolat" is the “perfect Lenten read.” The book opens on Shrove Tuesday and ends with Easter Monday and we’ll follow the Lenten journey of the citizens of the village of Lansquenet, after chocolatier Vianne Rocher opens her shop and turns their quiet little town on its ear.

The book description promises that “every page offers a description of chocolate to melt in the mouths of chocoholics, francophiles, armchair gourmets, cookbook readers, and lovers of passion everywhere.”

"Chocolat" should spark some interesting discussion about temptation, indulgence, and the value of austerity.

Happy Reading! 

~Christina & Natalie

Below is the March discussion schedule:

March 1-8:   Chapters 1-10

March 9-16:  Chapters 11-20

March 17-23:  Chapters 21-29

March 24-31: Chapters 30-39

Find us on Twitter @ediblebookclub #ediblebooks

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