Easy appetizer: stuffed endives

A versatile gluten-free appetizer that will please your guests no matter their taste preferences.

Beyond The Peel
Endives make a beautiful and neat vehicle for appetizers. Try filling them with grapefruit and avocado slices; smoked salmon atop sour cream; herbed goat cheese; or a sweet beet and apple slaw.

Today's Beyond the Peel post is the last in our series of quick, easy and healthy holiday appetizers. I hope that over the course of the past month you have gotten some good ideas on how to make your holiday entertaining not only a little healthier but also a little easier. For some holiday appy ideas, check out our appetizer videos on www.beyondthepeel.net.

Out of all the ideas we’ve shared, I find stuffed endives to be the easiest and most flexible. You can fill endives with just about anything. If you’re at a loss for ideas, I’ll share four of my favorites with you in this video (posted below) that not only take minutes to assemble, but will have your grain free or gluten free guests happy to not be surrounded by crackers, crostinis, and baguette!

Following are links to the appetizers highlighted in the video and a list of all the other fabulous appetizers posts we did leading up until today:

Beet and Apple Slaw  (used as a filling for the endives)

 9 Healthy Whole Food Appetizers For The Holidays

Sour Cream Dill Dip and a Fun Entertaining Idea

Goat Cheese Stuffed Dates

Holiday Popcorn Recipe (or anytime, snack time recipe!)

Beet and Pear Slaw

4 cups of grated beets

1 firm pear, cored and diced

1 green onion, finely sliced

In a large bowl, add the grated beets, diced pear and sliced onion. Add the vinaigrette. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Apple Cider Vinaigrette

2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar

2 teaspoons olive oil

2 teaspoons raw honey

Combine the above ingredients until honey is well blended through out. Add the dressing to the salad and toss to coat well.

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