Almond butter banana 'fudge'

Trying to cut down on sweets or maintain a healthier lifestyle? It may not be traditional fudge, but give this almond butter banana fudge a try and your sweet tooth won't know the difference.

Beyond the Peel
Try this treat next time you're craving something sweet.

I like to keep a healthier treat at home for those times when all I crave is a major kick to the face with sugar. Often I get cravings for a small bite of chocolate or something sweet. A weakness of mine is ice cream (a reason why I never have any in the house).

I also think it is crucial to have a small little treat around if you’re making your way over to a whole foods diet – especially in the beginning stages. When processed foods get kicked to the curb in favor of whole natural foods, the outcome is a huge reduction of sugar and salt. These two key ingredients trick us into thinking these foods taste good. So as you eliminate processed foods you’ll no doubt be craving sugar and salt in a way you haven’t before because they were previously hiding in everything processed that was being consumed.

Arm yourself with some healthy or at least natural sweets, so when a sugar fix attacks you like a sale does to a shopaholic, you’ll have a stash of these to get you by. Your sweet tooth will be soothed and you’ll have successfully averted a grab for the Haagen Dazs.

Unbelievable almond butter banana “fudge”

1/2 cup coconut oil

1/2 cup almond butter

 1/8  to 1/4 cup of raw honey

1/2 of a banana, mashed

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Place all the ingredients in a small pot. Heat over low heat until things get melty, about 30 seconds. Blend with an emulsion blender until the mixture is smooth. Alternately a food processor would work and you can skip the melting process but blend for longer.

Pour into a small 3- x5-inch mini loaf pan lined with parchment paper or pour into silicone molds. Allow the mixture to cool in the freezer or fridge into solid. Slice into small 1- x1-inch squares or slices. Because of the coconut oil, these will melt if not kept in the fridge or freezer.

Other “fudge” flavor options:
 

Maple walnut fudge: Substitute maple syrup for honey. Blend until smooth and fold in 1/2 cup of chopped walnuts. For a lovely version of a Chocolate Peanut Butter “Fudge”, see Mindy at The Purposed Heart for this tasty version. Kimi at The Nourishing Gourmet featured this delightful fudge a few years ago if you’re more of a classic chocolate fudge kinda person. Over at Chocolate Covered Katie you’ll find all kinds of desserts to kick a sweet tooth in a more natural way, and her fudge inspired the banana in my recipe. Thanks Katie.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.