Snooki tips for Kimye and more: our parenting news roundup

Snooki, reality star and new mom, has some words of advice for pregnant Kim Kardashian. Screen time doesn't necessarily impede physical activity. And Octomom.... oh, Octomom. Our first parenting news roundup of 2013.

Associated Press
Snooki gaves pregnancy tips to Kim Kardashian and complimented her relationship with Kanye West this week. Here, Kimye watches the Miami Heat.

Snooki is giving Kim Kardashian pregnancy advice. Octomom is back on welfare. And a new study suggests that screen time doesn’t necessarily impact kids’ physical activity. 

Welcome to 2013.

If you missed any of these all important items this past week, never fear. That’s why we have our weekly parenting news roundup; our collection of tidbits that don’t quite make it onto our daily news page.   

First up: 

From slug to sprinter? Not so fast.

American kids spend way more time in front of screens – that’s televisions, computers, the whole collection – than is good for them, experts have found again and again. A lot of children also don’t get doctors' recommended amount of physical activity. But in a new survey published this week in “JAMA Pediatrics,” researchers say that the two are not necessarily connected. 

In other words, just turning off the television will not transform Junior from a couch potato into an athlete. 

According to parents’ answers to the survey, 70 percent of children aged 6 to 11 met the recommendations for physical activity (at least one hour a day), while 54 percent met the screen-time recommendations (less than two hours).  Thirty-eight percent met both sets of guidelines.  (And researchers say that parents likely overestimate their children’s exercise.)  

While obesity was tied to both not getting enough exercise and spending too much time in front of screens, there were few other links, researchers said. 

Octomom. Sigh.

On the topic of celebrity train wrecks, we learned this week that Nadya Suleman – dubbed “Octomom” after the birth of her octuplets in 2009 – was back on welfare. A representative explained to the press that she had used up all of her savings after she entered a rehabilitation center last year for “anxiety, exhaustion and stress.”  Apparently there was not enough cash left over from her solo porn video, which won a number of Adult Video News award nominations last year.  Meanwhile, other news reports say that she has lost a lawsuit over a diamond ring allegedly stolen after a celebrity boxing fight.

Sigh. 

Does anyone else out there just find this depressing? It’s as if this one woman is manifesting all of society’s neuroses about moms, sex, money and kids, all by herself.  

Snooki words of wisdom for Kim.  (Really?)

Luckily for her, Kim Kardashian will not have to face pregnancy alone. Along with thousands of fans, photographers, producers, family members and entourage members – not to mention baby daddy Kanye West –  the reality star will have the guidance of new mom Snooki. 

Remember, those of you who would rather forget all of this, that the former “Jersey Shore” star gave birth to a son, Lorenzo, this past summer. 

Now, she says, she misses being pregnant, so is advising fellow reality personality Kardashian to “just relax and enjoy” it. Snooki admitted on MTV News earlier this week that she herself was not a huge fan of the whole pregnancy thing while it was going on, but says that she now finds herself longing for those good old days. 

Snooki also gave the thumbs up to the Kimye relationship. 

“I think Kim and Kanye are going to really good parents,” she said. “Obviously, they are in love with each other, and I think Kim has finally found her man. They both love fame and the spotlight so I think they are a perfect match and I think they are going to be great parents.”

Phew.  I feel much more comfortable now.  You?

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.