Condom use increases among teenagers, say researchers

Although condom use is increasing among teenagers, advocates say there is still more to be done to prevent the spread of HIV amongst people younger than 30. Researchers say the teen years are a key time for safe-sex education.

Kevin Lamarque/Reuters
A visitor passes an exhibition at the International AIDS 2012 Conference in Washington on July 23, 2012. At the conference, researchers announced that more teenagers are using condoms, but that more still needs to be done to educate teenagers on HIV prevention.

More high school students are using condoms than 20 years ago — but progress has stalled with a lot of work still needed to protect young people from the AIDS virus, government researchers reported Tuesday.

Today, 4 of every 10 new HIV infections occur in people younger than 30, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — and the teen years, just as youths become sexually active, are key for getting across the safe-sex message.

Using a long-standing survey of high school students' health, the CDC tracked how teen sexual behavior has changed over 20 years. The results are decidedly mixed.

About 60 percent of sexually active high school students say they used a condom the last time they had sex, researchers told the International AIDS Conference. That's an improvement from the 46 percent who were using condoms in 1991.

"This is good news," said Kevin Fenton, director of CDC's HIV prevention center. But, "we need to do a lot more."

The problem: Condom use reached a high of 63 percent back in 2003.

Black students are most likely to heed the safe-sex message, yet their condom use dropped from a high of 70 percent in 1999 to 65 percent last year, the study found.

About half of high school students have had sex, a proportion that hasn't changed much over the two decades, the CDC reported. Today, 47 percent say they've had sex, down just a bit from 54 percent in 1991. Again, black teens made the most progress, with 60 percent sexually active today compared with 82 percent two decades ago.

The more partners, the more risk. Fifteen percent of high school students say they've had four or more partners, down from 19 percent in 1991.

Dr. Fenton said part of the problem is that many school systems don't have strong enough sex education policies that include teaching teens about how to prevent HIV. But he cautioned that the CDC study can't link the abstinence-only policies pushed by Congress through the late 1990s and early 2000s to the stalled progress.

In South Carolina, 18-year-old Quinandria Lee offers an example of the safe sex practices that CDC says more young people should adopt.

Ms. Lee was frustrated at her school's abstinence-only focus. She learned about both male and female condoms from the South Carolina Contraceptive Campaign, and last year her principal allowed her to teach her classmates about them. Condoms are the only contraceptive that also protect against HIV infection.

But Lee credits her mother's frank talk about sex with this key protective step: Lee persuaded her boyfriend to go with her to a clinic where both got a clean bill of health before they ever had sex. Still, they use a condom every time.

"It's hard," she said of that get-tested conversation. But "you can't be too sure."

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.