SAG Awards 2015: Here's who took the big prizes

The movie 'Birdman' triumphed at the SAG Awards, winning the guild's version of the Best Picture award, while 'The Theory of Everything' actor Eddie Redmayne and Julianne Moore of 'Still Alice' also took home prizes.

Atsushi Nishijima/Fox Searchlight/AP
'Birdman' stars Michael Keaton.

Oscar contender “Birdman” got an awards season boost at the 2015 Screen Actors Guild Awards, taking the Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture prize (the SAG equivalent of the Best Picture award). 

The films “Boyhood,” which was filmed over 12 years and follows a boy and his family, and “Birdman,” which centers on the struggles of an actor trying to revive his career by starring in a Broadway play, are currently regarded as two of the frontrunners for the Oscars Best Picture prize. At the Golden Globes, “Boyhood” competed in the Best Motion Picture – Drama category, while “Birdman” was part of the Best Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical race, but when the two films faced off in the same category at the SAG Awards, “Birdman” emerged as the victor. (“Birdman” didn’t take the Best Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical prize at the Globes, either – that went to the film “The Grand Budapest Hotel” – so this is an important win for “Birdman.”)

Meanwhile, the winners in the SAG Awards film acting categories look more and more like frontrunners, if not locks, for wins at the Oscars. As at the Golden Globes, “The Theory of Everything” actor Eddie Redmayne took home the Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role award, while Julianne Moore of “Still Alice” won the Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role prize. “Boyhood” actress Patricia Arquette took the Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role award, while J.K. Simmons of “Whiplash” won the Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role prize. All of them will be hard to beat come Oscar night. 

As for the TV categories, the big drama prize – Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series – went to the British drama “Downton Abbey,” while the TV show “Orange is the New Black” won the comedy equivalent, titled Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series. Viola Davis won the Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series award for her show “How to Get Away with Murder,” while “House of Cards” actor Kevin Spacey won the Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series. “Orange Is the New Black” actress Uzo Aduba took the Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series award, while William H. Macy of “Shameless” won the Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series award.

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