N.J. earthquake rumbles, but leaves no injuries

N.J. earthquake: It was a relatively small quake, just 2.0 magnitude which struck at 1:19 a.m. Monday. But N.J. residents reported hearing a loud boom at the time of the earthquake.

REUTERS/New Jersey Governor's Office/Tim Larsen/Handout
A 2.0 earthquake rattled N.J. even as recovery efforts continue in the state. Volunteers from Crossfit ACT of Saddle Brook help unload donated water from Walmart at the mobile Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) site in Little Ferry, New Jersey.

 Some residents in northern New Jersey awoke to a small earthquake early Monday.

The temblor, with a magnitude of 2.0, struck at 1:19 a.m. and was centered in Ringwood, a community that's still dealing with downed trees and power outages from Sandy.

Geophysicist Jessica Turner at the National Earthquake Information Center says some people reported hearing a loud boom. Turner says those on upper floors of a home might have felt shaking or saw objects on walls vibrate.

The quake was 3 miles below ground and could also be felt in Mahwah, Wanaque, Oakland, Franklin Lakes, West Milford and Paterson.

Ringwood police say there are no reports of damage.

Turner says the last earthquake in New Jersey had a 2.2 magnitude and was recorded in February 2010.

For more on the frequency and location of N.J. earthquakes, check out the website of the N.J. Division of Water Supply and Geoscience.

IN PICTURES: Sandy, Chronicle of a superstorm

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.

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