A state-by-state look at superstorm's effects

Power outages now stand at more than 1.8 million homes and businesses, down from a peak of 8.5 million. Here's a snapshot of what is happening, state by state.

Adrees Latif/REUTERS
New York City Marathon runners carry relief supplies through a damaged neighborhood in the Staten Island borough of New York on November 4, 2012. Mayor Michael Bloomberg had canceled the race due to the devastation of superstorm Sandy.

The massive storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy slammed into the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, killing at least 107 people in the United States. Power outages now stand at more than 1.8 million homes and businesses, down from a peak of 8.5 million. Here's a snapshot of what is happening, state by state.

CONNECTICUT: Utility companies say all polling places will have power on Election Day, although some might be from generators. Commuter rail service along the Danbury and Waterbury branches of Metro-North Railroad's New Haven Line will resume Monday. There will be bus service on the New Canaan branch line, at least for two days. Deaths: 3. Power outages: 75,200, down from a peak of 625,000.

NEW JERSEY: Rationing system for auto fuel in effect for its first full day, while water recedes in some shore towns. Students will return to class Monday in dozens of schools shuttered by Sandy. Deaths: 23. Power outages: 950,000, down from 2.7 million.

NEW YORK: Thousands of runners poured into Central Park Sunday morning to run 26.2 miles, despite the marathon being called off Friday night; others ran to Staten Island to help storm victims. Gov. Andrew Cuomo says fuel shortage gripping area is a “short term” problem, but will continue for days. Children go back to school Monday. Deaths: 48, including 41 in New York City. Power outages: 657,000, down from 2.2 million.

PENNSYLVANIA: The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority is loaning 31 of its buses to NJ Transit, which will use the vehicles to support shuttle service for New Jersey commuters traveling to New York City. Deaths: 15. Power outages: 91,000, down from 1.2 million.

RHODE ISLAND: Police and National Guard troops continued to staff checkpoints as officials in Westerly and Charlestown limited access to damaged beach communities to property owners and construction workers. Deaths: None. Power outages: none, down from more than 122,000.

WEST VIRGINIA: The Secretary of State's Office moved polling places in five precincts in three counties hard hit last week by Sandy. More changes could come before Election Day on Tuesday. Deaths: 6. Power outages: 53,000, down from 270,000.

Other states with storm-related deaths: Maryland (4), New Hampshire (1), North Carolina (3), Ohio (2), Virginia (2).

Sources: Local and state authorities; AP reporting

IN PICTURES: Sandy: Chronicle of an unrelenting storm

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