Watch giant tortoise rescue another tortoise

Check out this video taken at the Taipei Zoo of one tortoise helping another get back on its feet

YouTube
A tortoise rescues his mate at Taipei Zoo

If you're struggling, sometimes you just need a hand. Or a nudge. 

A video of one tortoise rescuing another, which was stuck laying its back, is going viral. The YouTube video was uploaded by AuDi Yu in November and filmed at the Taipei Zoo in Taiwan. He wrote that he and his daughter went to the zoo as part of a school field trip.

You can hear the class encouraging the tortoise rescue and their cheers as the tortoise regains its footing and the two walk off.

What a great life lesson for this class.

Tortoises are among the creatures with the longest lifespans on Earth. The oldest tortoise ever recorded was named Tu'i Malila ("king Malila") (c. 1777-May 19, 1966). The tortoise was given as a gift to the royal family of Tonga by the famous English explorer Captain James Cook. He apparently bought it from a Dutch merchant in Cape Town, South Africa

It belonged to the species radiated tortoise (Geochelone radiata) from Madagascar. It remained in the care of the royal family until death on 19 May, 1965 due to natural causes, at the age of 188.

Apparently, these tortoises aren't the only ones looking after their own. When a six-week-old baby elephant named Omysha toppled over onto her back at Zurich Zoo, in Switzerland, three adult elephants rushed over to set her on her feet. The incident was uploaded to YouTube in Oct. 2-14 

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.