Japan super typhoon: Neoguri barrels toward Japanese islands

Japan super typhoon Neoguri is expected to reach Okinawa early Tuesday, and could be one of the strongest to hit Japan in decades, according to the Japan Meteorological Agency. Typhoon Neoguri comes on the tail end of Japan's summer rainy season.

Kyodo News/AP
Fishing boats are tied with ropes at Tomari fishing port in Naha, southern Japan islands of Okinawa, Monday. Japan has issued warnings over a powerful Typhoon Neoguri churning toward the southern islands of Okinawa.

Japan was bracing for destructive winds and huge waves as a powerful Typhoon Neoguri churned Monday toward the southern islands of Okinawa after sparing the Philippines.

Typhoon Neoguri is expected to reach Okinawa early Tuesday, packing sustained winds of 198 kilometers (123 miles) per hour and gusts up to 270 kph (168 mph), the Japan Meteorological Agency said. It said the storm could be one of the strongest to hit Japan in decades, generating waves up to 14 meters (46 feet) high.

"There is a risk of unprecedentedly strong winds and torrential rains. Please refrain from nonessential outdoor activities," Meteorological Agency official Satoshi Ebihara told reporters at a news conference.

The agency issued a special warning for violent winds and flood tides.

Television reports showed workers in Okinawa tying braces onto palm trees to help minimize damage.

Government leaders held an emergency meeting and urged local governments and residents to take maximum precautions.

Forecasts show the storm tracking toward Kyushu island and then across Japan's main island of Honshu. It is forecast to lose some power over land, but winds and heavy rains could cause landslides and other damage, Ebihara warned.

The typhoon comes on the tail end of Japan's summer rainy season, and landslide warnings already are in effect for some areas due to those seasonal downpours.

The Philippines was spared from the ferocious winds of Neoguri, which blew closest to land late Monday when it roared about 480 kilometers (298 miles) east of the northernmost province of Batanes, government weather forecaster Gladys Saludes said.

While the typhoon did not make landfall, it intensified the southwest monsoon, dumping heavy rains to some western Philippine provinces, she said.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.