ADP: US added 162,000 jobs in September

ADP survey showed that US businesses added fewer workers in September than August, a sign that slow growth may be holding back hiring. The economy added 162,000 jobs last month, down from 189,000 in August, according to ADP.

Tina Fineberg/AP/File
In this September 2012 file photo, Luis Gomez, seated center, hands his resume to a representative from White Rose Foods, right, during a job fair at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx borough of New York. An ADP survey relased Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, shows that US businesses hired fewer workers in September than August, a sign that slow growth may be holding back hiring.

A private survey shows that U.S. businesses added fewer workers in September than August, a sign that slow growth may be holding back hiring.

Payroll processor ADP said Wednesday that companies added 162,000 jobs last month. That's below August's total of 189,000, which was revised lower.

The September increase was better than economists had expected. And it marks the latest in a string of modest hiring gains reported by the survey in recent months. Still, the gain isn't enough to significantly push down the unemployment rate, which has been above 8 percent for three and a half years.

About 100,000 new jobs are needed each month just to keep up with the growth of the working-age population. Twice as many are typically needed on a consistent basis to bring unemployment down rapidly.

"While the economy isn't plunging into recession, it still isn't creating enough jobs to drive the unemployment rate lower either," said Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist at Capital Economics.

The report only covers hiring in the private sector and excludes government employment. The Labor Department will offer a more complete picture of September hiring on Friday.

The ADP and government surveys frequently diverge. In August, the government said private companies added 103,000.

Economists forecast that the Labor Department report will show employers added 111,000 jobs in September, slightly more than August. The unemployment rate is expected to tick up to 8.2 percent.

In September, services companies added 144,000 jobs, the ADP report said. Manufacturing, construction and other goods-producing industries gained 18,000.

The economy grew at a 1.3 percent annual rate in the April-June quarter, down from 2 percent in the January-March quarter and 4.1 percent in the final three months of last year.

Most economists expect growth to stay at about 2 percent for the rest of this year.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.