Skippy peanut butter recalled for small metal shards

Hormel Foods is voluntarily recalling a limited number of jars of its Skippy peanut butter in seven US states because they might contain small pieces of metal shavings. The recall involves 153 cases, or 1,871 pounds, of Skippy Reduced Fat Creamy Peanut Butter Spread.

Hormel Foods Corp said on Thursday that it was voluntarily recalling a limited number of jars of its Skippy peanut butter in seven U.S. states because they might contain small pieces of metal shavings.

The recall involves 153 cases, or 1,871 pounds, of Skippy Reduced Fat Creamy Peanut Butter Spread. It is limited to 16.3 ounce jars with a "Best If Used By" date of DEC1416LR1 with a package UPC code of 37600-10500.

The jars were sent to distribution centers for Publix , Target and Walmart located in Georgia, Virginia, Alabama, North Carolina, South Carolina, Delaware and Arkansas, Hormel said.

A Hormel spokesman said in an email that the metal shavings entered the jars because of an equipment malfunction that has since then been repaired.

Foodborne objects that are greater than 7 mm (1/4 inch) in length may cause injury.

The full recall notice from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is below: 

Hormel Foods Sales LLC is voluntarily recalling 153 cases, or 1,871 total pounds, of a single code date of SKIPPY® Reduced Fat Creamy Peanut Butter Spread, due to the possibility that some jars may contain small pieces of metal shavings which were discovered on an in-line magnet check during routine cleaning. Foodborne objects that are greater than 7mm in length may cause injury. The recalled product is limited to 16.3 ounce jars with a "Best If Used By" date of DEC1416LR1 with a package UPC code of 37600-10500. The code date is located on top of the lid. A photo of the product and "Best If Used By" date appears below. Recalled product was sent to distribution centers for Publix, Target and Walmart located in Georgia, Virginia, Alabama, North Carolina, South Carolina, Delaware and Arkansas.

The company is issuing the recall to ensure that consumers are made aware of the potential hazard. No reports have been received to date of any consumer injuries or complaints.

No other sizes, varieties or other packaging configurations of SKIPPY® brand peanut butter or peanut spreads are included in this recall.

If a consumer has this product, they should return it to the store where purchased for an exchange or call Hormel Foods Customer Relations at 1-866-475-4779, Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Central Time, excluding holidays.

This recall is being initiated out of an abundance of caution and with the knowledge of the US Food and Drug Administration.

Hormel shares were little changed at $67.87 on Thursday afternoon.

(Reporting by Anjali Athavaley; Editing by Alan Crosby and Christian Plumb)

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