London 2012 archery: Italy takes gold, USA gets silver

London 2012 archery: The men's team archery competition was won by Italy. It was Italy's first-ever gold medal in archery. The USA came in second, and South Korea placed third.

(AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
London 2012 archery: Italy's Marco Galiazzo shoots for a gold medal in the team archery competition during the 2012 Summer Olympics, Saturday, July 28, 2012, in London.

Italy won the gold medal in men's team archery at the Olympics on Saturday, beating the U.S. by one point on the final shot.

The Americans' silver was the country's first medal of the games. South Korea took bronze.

Michele Frangilli, Marco Galiazzo and Mauro Nespoli hugged and raised their hands in celebration after the final arrow beat the Americans 219-218 at Lord's Cricket Ground. The gold was Italy's first ever in the event.

The Team USA silver medalists were Jacob Wukie, Brady Ellison, Jake Kaminski.

South Korea bronze-winning team was comprised of Oh Jin Hyek, Im Dong Hyun, Kim Bubmin).

Here's a round by round breakdown of Saturday's men's team archery competition.

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1/8 Elimination

Ukraine (Markiyan Ivashko; Dmytro Hrachov; Viktor Ruban), def. Britain (Larry Godfrey; Simon Terry; Alan Wills), 223-212.

Japan (Takaharu Furukawa; Hideki Kikuchi; Yu Ishizu), def. India (Jayanta Talukdar; Tarundeep Rai; Rahul Banerjee), 214-214, (29-27).

Italy (Michele Frangilli; Marco Galiazzo; Mauro Nespoli), def. Taiwan (Yu-Cheng Chen; Cheng-Wei Kuo; Cheng-Pang Wang), 216-206.

Mexico (Juan Rene Serrano; Luis Eduardo Velez; Luis Alvarez), def. Malaysia (Chu Sian Cheng; Khairul Anuar Mohamad; Haziq Kamaruddin), 216-211.

Quarterfinals

South Korea (Oh Jin Hyek; Im Dong Hyun; Kim Bubmin), def. Ukraine (Markiyan Ivashko; Dmytro Hrachov; Viktor Ruban), 227-220.

United States (Jacob Wukie, Oak Harbor, Ohio.; Brady Ellison, Globe, Ariz.; Jake Kaminski, Elma, N.Y.), def. Japan (Takaharu Furukawa; Hideki Kikuchi; Yu Ishizu), 220-219.

Italy (Michele Frangilli; Marco Galiazzo; Mauro Nespoli), def. China (Dai Xiaoxiang; Liu Zhaowu; Xing Yu), 220-216.

Mexico (Juan Rene Serrano; Luis Eduardo Velez; Luis Alvarez), def. France (Romain Girouille; Gael Prevost; Thomas Faucheron), 220-212.

Semifinals

United States (Jacob Wukie, Oak Harbor, Ohio.; Brady Ellison, Globe, Ariz.; Jake Kaminski, Elma, N.Y.), def. South Korea (Oh Jin Hyek; Im Dong Hyun; Kim Bubmin), 224-219.

Italy (Michele Frangilli; Marco Galiazzo; Mauro Nespoli), def. Mexico (Juan Rene Serrano; Luis Eduardo Velez; Luis Alvarez), 217-215.

Bronze medal

South Korea (Oh Jin Hyek; Im Dong Hyun; Kim Bubmin), def. Mexico (Juan Rene Serrano; Luis Eduardo Velez; Luis Alvarez), 224-219.

Gold Medal

Italy (Michele Frangilli; Marco Galiazzo; Mauro Nespoli), def. United States (Jacob Wukie, Oak Harbor, Ohio.; Brady Ellison, Globe, Ariz.; Jake Kaminski, Elma, N.Y.), 219-218.

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