Over a dozen trapped after Turkish coal mine accident

Officials say a broken water pipe is flooding the mine, from where 20 others were able to escape or were rescued.

Surging water trapped at least 18 workers Tuesday in a coal mine in Turkey, officials and reports said — an event likely to raise even more concerns about the nation's poor workplace safety standards.

Initial reports said flooding inside the Has Sekerler mine near the town of Ermenek in Karaman province caused a cave-in, but subsequent reports workers were trapped by the water. Turkey's emergency management agency, AFAD, said a broken pipe in the mine caused the flooding but did not elaborate.

Gov. Murat Koca said about 20 other workers escaped or were rescued from the mine, 300 miles south of Ankara, close to Turkey's Mediterranean coast

Sahin Uyar, an official at the privately owned coal mine, told private NTV television that the miners were stuck some 330 yards underground.

"At the moment, 18 of our colleagues are trapped. We are working to pump water out from three sections of the mine," he told NTV, adding that rescue crews had made no contact with the miners.

Uyar said the trapped workers' chances of survival were slim unless they had managed to reach a safety gallery.

Turkey's ministers for energy and transportation immediately left Ankara, the capital, to oversee the rescue operation. AFAD said it had sent 225 people to join rescuers from neighboring mines and regions.

In May, a fire inside a coal mine in the western town of Soma killed 301 miners in Turkey's worst mining disaster. The fire exposed poor safety standards and superficial government inspections in many of the country's mines.

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