Anna Politkovskaya: Moscow jury convicts five for her murder

Anna Politkovskaya was a Russian journalist who was murdered eight years ago. Tuesday, five men were convicted for their involvement in the killing of Anna Politkovskaya.

Pavel Golovkin/AP
Background from left, Lom-Ali Gaitukayev, Ibragim Makhmudov, center, and Sergey Hadjikurbanov, accused of the murder of journalist Anna Politkovskaya, await the judge's verdict in a glass cage, at the Moscow City Court, Russia, Wednesday, May 21, 2014.

A Moscow court has convicted five men of involvement in the murder of journalist Anna Politkovskaya, three of whom were acquitted in a previous trial.

Tuesday's jury verdict found that Rustam Makhmudov was the gunman who shot Politkovskaya in the elevator of her Moscow apartment building in 2006 and that four others — his two brothers, their uncle and a former policeman — were accomplices.

Both brothers and the policeman had been acquitted in a 2009 trial, but the Supreme Court ordered a new trial. A judge is expected to sentence the five men Wednesday; all could face up to life in prison.

Politkovskaya's work in the Novaya Gazeta newspaper was sharply critical of the Kremlin and its policies in Chechnya. The Makhmudovs and their uncle are of Chechen origin.

Authorities have not identified any person as responsible for ordering the killing. Sergei Markin, a spokesman for Russia's Investigative Committee, was quoted by the RIA Novosti state news agency as saying it was pursuing "exhaustive measures" to identify that person.

"We agree with the verdict, but this is only a small part of those who are guilty in the crime," the journalist's son Ilya Politkovsky was quoted as telling the Interfax news agency.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.