Joran van der Sloot to be father, husband

Joran van der Sloot, convicted of murdering a 21-year-old student, and his fiance have nearly completed legal arrangements to wed. The future Mrs. van der Sloot is five months pregnant with a boy, according to his lawyer.

Karel Navarro/AP/File
Joran van der Sloot sits in the courtroom before his sentencing at San Pedro prison in Lima, Peru, in 2012. Van der Sloot's lawyer, Maximo Altez, said Wednesday the 26-year-old Dutchman and his Peruvian fiance have nearly completed legal arrangements to wed. He says the future Mrs. van der Sloot, Leydi Figueroa, is five months pregnant with a boy.

Joran van der Sloot's lawyer says the convicted murder is soon to be both father and husband.

Maximo Altez told The Associated Press on Wednesday that the 26-year-old Dutchman and his Peruvian fiance have nearly completed legal arrangements to wed. The future Mrs. van der Sloot is five months pregnant with a boy, he said.

Altez has said van der Sloot's met 22-year-old Leydi Figueroa Uceda while she was selling goods inside Lima's Piedras Gordas prison, where the two are to be married on an as-yet undetermined date.

Van der Sloot remains the chief suspect in the unsolved 2005 disappearance in his native Aruba of U.S. teen Natalee Holloway.

He is serving a 28-year sentence for killing a 21-year-old female Peruvian student he met in a Lima casino.

Altez said that Van der Sloot keeps busy teaching English to fellow inmates and is studying international business via a correspondence course offered by a Peruvian university.

Once his sentence ends, he is to be extradited to the United States to face trial on charges he extorted and defrauded Holloway's mother shortly before traveling to Peru in 2010.

He allegedly took $25,000 from the mother, promising to lead her to Holloway's body.

Five years to the day after Holloway disappeared, van der Sloot bludgeoned to death Stephany Flores in a Lima hotel room.

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