Young boy killed as Morsi supporters and opponents clash in Egypt

Supporters of the deposed president were on the streets in at least two Egyptian cities Friday, protesting military rule in the Middle Eastern country.

Mohamed Abd El Ghany/REUTERS
Supporters and opponents of ousted president Mohamed Morsi throw stones near burning tires during clashes at Nasr City district, Cairo, November 22, 2013.

A 10-year-old boy was shot dead on Friday near clashes between supporters and opponents of deposed Islamist president Mohamed Morsi in Egypt's northern city of Suez, security and medical sources said.

Morsi's supporters have staged frequent protests across Egypt, many of them after Friday prayers, since the army deposed him on July 3 in response to mass protests against his rule, and arrested most of the top leaders of his Muslim Brotherhood.

On Friday, around 500 supporters of Morsi gathered in the central Awel-el-soor neighborhood of Suez and chanted slogans against the army and police. Clashes broke out with opponents of Morsi and rocks were thrown and shots exchanged, witnesses said.

The child, Samir El-Gamal, was hit by a bullet, the sources said, while walking with his mother near the clashes. His mother was unharmed, but the boy died on the spot, they said.

Members of Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood accused the security forces of using live rounds to disperse their protest, residents of Suez said. Police said the bullets had come from the opponents of the protesters, not from security forces.

The child's family accused the Brotherhood of responsibility for their child's death, the state news agency MENA said.

The interim government installed in July has waged a broad crackdown on the Brotherhood, accusing its leaders of fomenting violence or terrorism, accusations they deny.

The government has promised a return to democratic rule next year, under a new constitution. In the interim, the political turmoil that has gripped Egypt since the overthrow of Hosni Mubarak in early 2011 continues to undermine both stability and economic growth.

Elsewhere, hundreds of pro-Brotherhood protesters tried to force their way into the embassy of the United Arab Emirates in Cairo and attacked its guards, but police used teargas to disperse them, the state newspaper al-Ahram said.

Since Morsi was deposed, the UAE and other Gulf Arab allies have shown strong support to the interim government, pledging billions of dollars to help shore up Egypt's fragile finances.

In the Nozha area of central Cairo, pro-Morsi protesters threw petrol bombs at two carriages of a tram, but police put out the fire, security sources and MENA said.

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