Tropical storm Sonia hits Mexico, weakens

Tropical storm Sonia weakened to a tropical depression, with 35 mph winds and heavy rains.The resort town of Los Cabos and the states of Sinoloa, Durango, and Chihuahua are forecast to get 6 to 10 inches of rain Monday.

National Hurricane Center
Tropical storm Sonia weakened into a tropical depression Monday as it made landfall. Heavy rains are forecast.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Monday that Tropical Storm Sonia has been downgraded to a tropical depression as it hit land in Mexico.

The center in Miami said the center of Sonia reached the coast of Sinaloa near the city of El Dorado early on Monday.

Its maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 35 mph (55 kph), and it will likely dissipate later Monday over Mexico's mountainous terrain.

Even though Sonia is weakening, heavy rains are still possible in Sinaloa, western Durango and southern Chihuahua, the center said.

The government of Sinaloa state said classes were canceled for Monday in five municipalities that could be affected by the storm. Sixty shelters were being opened in case anyone had to evacuate their homes.

In the resort town of Los Cabos in Baja California, officials opened a shelter for possible evacuees and said the port had been closed to small craft.

The hurricane center said the storm could produce up to 6 inches (about 15 centimeters) of rainfall in Sinaloa and Durango states, with isolated areas getting as much as 10 inches (25 centimeters). These rains could produce flooding and mudslides, warns the National Hurricane Center in Miami.

In September, Mexico suffered its worst flooding since records began when storms Manuel and Ingrid converged from the Pacific and the Gulf of Mexico, killing more than 150 people and causing damage estimated at around $6 billion.

Last month, Hurricane Raymond caused some flooding as it approached the Pacific resort cities of Acapulco and Zihuantanejo, but no deaths or major damage was reported.

Sonia is the eighteenth named storm system during the current eastern Pacific hurricane season, which began in May and is set to conclude at the end of this month.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.

QR Code to Tropical storm Sonia hits Mexico, weakens
Read this article in
https://www.csmonitor.com/World/Latest-News-Wires/2013/1104/Tropical-storm-Sonia-hits-Mexico-weakens
QR Code to Subscription page
Start your subscription today
https://www.csmonitor.com/subscribe