Taiwan earthquake: 6.0 magnitude earthquake sways buildings

An earthquake variously reported as magnitude 6.0 and 6.1 struck 155 miles from Taipei Wednesday morning, shaking buildings and injuring one woman.

United States Geological Survey
The earthquake that struck the island nation of Taiwan had an epicenter in Nantou County, about 250 kilometers (155 miles) south of Taipei.

A strong earthquake struck a rural township in central Taiwan on Wednesday, swaying buildings, sending schoolchildren to seek cover, and injuring at least one office worker, officials said.

The Central Weather Bureau said the magnitude-6.1 earthquake was felt throughout the island. The quake, which hit at a depth of 15 kilometers (9 miles), swayed buildings in the capital of Taipei, and officials said sections of the high-speed rail were temporarily suspended from service for damage inspection.

Near the epicenter in Nantou County, a section of a ceiling fell from a government office, injuring one worker, officials said.

Nantou government official Chen Min-hui said tiles fell from a few school buildings and minor cracks appeared on walls, but all structures remained intact.

Nantou is a rural county about 250 kilometers (155 miles) south of Taipei. It is near the epicenter of a magnitude-7.6 earthquake that killed more than 2,300 people in 1999.

Earthquakes frequently rattle Taiwan, but most are minor and cause little or no damage.

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