Argentina's Pres. Fernandez asks UK to return Falklands

Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner published an open letter in the Guardian newspaper urging Prime Minister David Cameron to honor UN resolutions which she says backs her case for the return of the islands, which Argentina calls the Malvinas. 

Victor R. Caivano/AP/File
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez delivers a speech in Dec.

Argentina's president called on Britain on Thursday to relinquish control of the FalklandIslands, accusing London of taking part in an act of "blatant colonialism" in claiming the wind-swept archipelago.

Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner published an open letter in the Guardian newspaper urging Prime Minister David Cameron to honor U.N. resolutions which she says backs her case for the return of the islands, which Argentina calls the Malvinas. She has made several similar demands in the past.

"180 years ago on the same date, January 3rd, in a blatant exercise of 19th-century colonialism, Argentina was forcibly stripped of the Malvinas Islands, which are situated 14,000 kilometers (8,700 miles) away from London," she says in the letter, copied to U.N Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

Britain asserted control of the south Atlantic islands by placing a naval garrison there in 1833. Britain and Argentina fought a brief war in 1982 after Argentina invaded the islands. More than 900 people died, most of them Argentines

Britain's Foreign Office said in a statement Thursday that the people of the Falklands are British and have chosen to be so. The office said there can be no negotiations on the sovereignty of the islands "unless and until such time as the Islanders so wish."

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