Prince Charles assault thwarted in New Zealand

Prince Charles assault? Not quite. New Zealand police arrested a 76-year-old man who was allegedly planning to assault Prince Charles, and his wife Camilla, with a bucket of horse manure.

(AP Photo/SNPA, Ross Setford)
Britain's Prince Charles greets well-wishers in Queen Street in Auckland, New Zealand, Monday, Nov. 12, 2012.

Police say they caught a New Zealand man before he had a chance to throw a bucket of horse manure over Prince Charles and his wife Camilla during a royal visit to the Pacific nation.

Castislav "Sam" Bacanov, 76, pleaded not guilty in an Auckland court Tuesday to planning a crime in a public place. He has agreed under his bail conditions to keep at least 500 meters (1,600 feet) from the royal couple.

The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall are on a six-day tour of New Zealand, the last leg of their Pacific tour marking Queen Elizabeth II's 60th Jubilee.

Police spokeswoman Noreen Hegarty said officers arrested Bacanov, a known anti-royalist, on Monday near a downtown Auckland venue where Charles and Camilla were due to appear. She said the royal couple had not yet arrived at the outdoor venue and were never in any danger.

Hegarty said officers were making sure the area was safe when they noticed the man with the bucket.

Bacanov is due to appear in court again on Nov. 27.

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Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.

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