U.S. condemns arrests of top Hong Kong democracy advocates

On Saturday, the arrest of at least 14 pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong was criticized by the U.S. as jeopardizing rule of law in the region.

AP Photo/Vincent Yu
Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai, center, who founded local newspaper Apple Daily, is arrested by police officers at his home in Hong Kong, Saturday, April 18, 2020. Hong Kong police arrested at least 14 pro-democracy lawmakers and activists on Saturday.

The United States condemned the arrests of at least 14 veteran pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong on charges of joining massive anti-government protests last year, saying the police action jeopardizes a high degree of autonomy guaranteed the southern Chinese city.

Among those arrested Saturday were 81-year-old activist and former lawmaker Martin Lee and democracy advocates Albert Ho, Lee Cheuk-yan, and Au Nok-hin. Police also arrested media tycoon Jimmy Lai, who founded the local newspaper Apple Daily.

The sweeping crackdown amid a coronavirus pandemic is based on charges of unlawful assembly stemming from huge rallies against proposed China extradition legislation that exposed deep divisions between democracy-minded Hong Kongers and the Communist Party-ruled central government in Beijing.

The bill – which would have allowed the residents of the semi-autonomous Chinese territory to be sent to mainland to stand trial – has been withdrawn, but the protests continued for more than seven months, centered around demands for voting rights and an independent inquiry into police conduct.

While the protests began peacefully, they increasingly descended into violence after demonstrators became frustrated with the government’s response. They feel that Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam has ignored their demands and used the police to suppress them.

"This is not the rule of law. This is what authoritarian governments do," former Hong Kong governor Chris Paten said in a statement, adding that it is becoming clearer each day that "Beijing is determined to throttle Hong Kong".

Mr. Patten also addressed the ongoing row over Beijing officials openly criticizing pro-democracy lawmakers and accusing them of misconduct in public office with their filibustering in Legco, reported RTIHK in Hong Kong

"This assault on Hong Kong's freedoms comes hard on the heels of ludicrous attempts in the last few days by Beijing's officials to argue that the Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, and the liaison office in Hong Kong, are not the same as the rest of the Beijing government and can interfere in Hong Kong's affairs without breaching the Joint Declaration and the Basic Law," Mr. Patten said.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo condemned the arrests in a statement.

“Beijing and its representatives in Hong Kong continue to take actions inconsistent with commitments made under the Sino-British Joint Declaration that include transparency, the rule of law, and guarantees that Hong Kong will continue to ‘enjoy a high degree of autonomy,'" Mr. Pompeo said. He was referring to the 1997 handover of the former British colony to China, which promised the city would enjoy political freedoms not afforded mainland China.

Attorney General William Barr also weighed in with a statement saying these events show how "antithetical the values of the Chinese Communist Party are to those we share in Western liberal democracies. These actions – along with their malign influence activity and industrial espionage here in the United States – demonstrate once again that the Chinese Communist Party cannot be trusted.”

Britain's Foreign Office also criticized the arrests, saying “the right to peaceful protest is fundamental to Hong Kong’s way of life and as such is protected in both the Joint Declaration and the Basic Law.”

Beijing has accused the U.S. and other Western countries of instigating the protests and insists they're China's internal affairs.

The Office of the Commissioner of the Chinese Foreign Ministry in Hong Kong said police were enforcing the law against those suspected of organizing and participating in unauthorized assemblies, and foreign countries have no right to interfere, China's official Xinhua News Agency reported.

“It is completely wrong that the U.K. Foreign Office spokesperson has distorted the truth by painting unauthorized assemblies as ‘peaceful protests,' in a bid to whitewash, condone, and exonerate the anti-China troublemakers in Hong Kong," the statement said.

Lai, Lee Cheuk-yan, and Yeung Sum – a former lawmaker from the Democratic Party who was also arrested – were charged in February over their involvement in a rally on Aug. 31 last year.

The Hong Kong authorities had denied permission for most of the rallies and police increasingly used tear gas and pepper spray against demonstrators, arresting hundreds.

The League of Social Democrats wrote in a Facebook post on Saturday that its leaders were among those arrested, including chairman Raphael Wong. They were accused of participating in two unauthorized protests on Aug. 18 and Oct. 1 last year.

This story was reported by The Associated Press.

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