Meanwhile in … The Hague, a church has held a seven-week-long continuous service to stop a family from being deported

And in Chiang Rai, Thailand, the cave where 12 boys were famously rescued this summer has become a busy tourist destination.

Peter Dejong/AP
Theo Hettema is the chair of the general council of the protestant Bethel Church in the Hague.

In the Hague, a church has held a seven-week-long continuous service to stop a family from being deported. According to Dutch law, police cannot enter places of worship during an ongoing religious service. The Bethel Church has used that loophole to protect an Armenian family of five who are slated for immediate deportation; they originally fled Armenia because they feared political persecution. More than 450 officials from different religions have held sermons in a wide range of languages since Oct. 26, and, at press time, the church says it has no plans to stop.

In Chiang Rai, Thailand, the cave where 12 boys were famously rescued this summer has become a busy tourist destination. In July, Tham Luang Nang Non cave was anxiously watched by the world as rescuers worked to save 12 soccer team members and their coach from a flooded underground passage. The cave, which was once an obscure location, has become a tourist hot spot and enlivened the local economy. A museum to memorialize the rescue is currently being built, as well as a resort and many small shops.

In Formoso do Araguaia, Brazil, a school on the edge of the rainforest was named “the world’s best new building.” Children Village, a boarding-school complex in a remote, rural area, was awarded the 2018 RIBA International Prize by the Royal Institute of British Architects. The prize is awarded to designs that embody “architectural ambition” but also deliver “meaningful social impact.” The team behind Children Village worked closely with school officials to find the best ways for students to study and enjoy recreational time during their stays.

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