Iran signs $16.6 bln deal for 80 Boeing planes, report

The deal with the U.S. aircraft maker is the biggest U.S.-Iran deal since the 1979 Islamic revolution.

AP Photo/Hasan Sarbakhshian, File
FILE - In this June 2003 file photo, a Boeing 747 of Iran's national airline is seen at Mehrabad International Airport in Tehran. Iran said Sunday it has finalized a $16.8 billion deal with Boeing to purchase 80 passenger planes, a deal made possible by last year's landmark nuclear agreement.

IranAir said it signed a deal on Sunday to buy 80 passenger planes from U.S. aircraft maker Boeing, state news agency IRNAreported, in the biggest U.S.-Iran deal since the 1979 Islamic revolution.

The agency quoted Farhad Parvaresh, the chairman of Iran's flag carrier, as saying that the 10-year deal included 50 Boeing 737 aircraft and 30 777 planes.

Boeing said in June it had signed a tentative agreement to sell 100 jets to IranAir after Iranian statements about the deal.

IRNA said that Fletcher Barkdull, a Boeing regional director, was in Tehran for the signing ceremony. The agency quoted Barkdull as saying that the deal was worth $16.6 billion and had been approved by the U.S. government.

In November, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill intending to block the sale of commercial aircraft to Iran, that would bar the U.S. Treasury from issuing licenses that U.S. banks would need to finance sales of commercial aircraft.

Congressional Republicans are making efforts to counter last year's nuclear accord between Iran, the United States and other world powers, that eased sanctions on the Islamic Republic.

The Boeing deal would help modernize and expand the Iran's aging fleet, kept going by smuggled or improvised parts after decades of sanctions.

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