How the 'vast right-wing conspiracy' is helping Hillary to the White House

The Benghazi hearings are only the latest and perhaps not the best example of this bid to put the one-time first lady into the Oval Office.

Evan Vucci/AP
Democratic presidential candidate, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton listens while testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington on Thursday before the House Benghazi Committee.

The vast right-wing conspiracy is conspiring again.

This time, it seems that they are conspiring to put Hillary Clinton into the White House.

Conservatives seem to be doing everything in their power to put the one-time first lady into the Oval Office.

The Benghazi hearings are only the latest and perhaps not the best example of this dynamic.

Let’s start, instead, with Donald Trump.

It’s the vast right-wing conspiracy (VRWC) that has put Trump into the lead in the Republican presidential primary system.

Trump offers the best chance for Hillary to gain the White House, followed closely by Ben Carson, who currently stands at No. 2.

The fact that Carson and Trump, two political neophytes of the highest order, are the most pleasant of dreams for Team Clinton should be troubling for any Republican.

They have been put into the top two positions by the vast right-wing conspiracy.

The VRWC has also decided to make Planned Parenthood a thing. Republicans seemingly want to make abortion a huge issue in this next campaign.

I am as pro-life as the next guy, but attempting to shut the government down over Planned Parenthood seems risky to me.

Mitt Romney won white women voters by 14 points in the last election and he still got stomped by President Obama.

The GOP Presidential candidate needs to win white women by at least 20 points if they hope to have any chance. Does the VRWC seriously believe that harping on abortion and Planned Parenthood is going to help us win over more white women?

Ummm, I doubt it.

The VRWC seems to want to make it easier to let criminals get out of jail. For a party that can win votes by being the party of law and order (which appeals to white women, by the way), going for a bipartisan approach to criminal justice reform seems a little silly to me. Why don’t we wait until Obama leaves office?

This effort is driven by right-wing think tanks that are funding the VRWC.

And that brings me to Benghazi.

Did we really need to make Hillary look like a hero?

We had a perfectly good sound-bite when she testified a couple years ago and completely lost her cool.

But, nope, we had to go ahead with a marathon hearing, which as far as I can tell, she escaped with no serious harm.

The odds were stacked against Chairman Trey Gowdy from the start.

It didn’t help that the House majority leader gaffed and let it slip that the committee’s investigation and Hillary’s declining poll numbers were seemingly linked. And where did Mr. McCarthy make that gaffe? On Sean Hannity’s show.

Hannity, as you know, is a leader in the Vast Right Wing Conspiracy.

It has been almost two decades since Hillary first complained that the VRWC was doing its best to destroy her and her husband.

It seems to me that they are making amends right now by helping her win the White House.

John Feehery publishes his Feehery Theory blog at http://www.thefeeherytheory.com/.

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