New video Ray Rice's lawyer did not want made public

After Ray Rice knocked his then-fiancée unconscious in an Atlantic City casino, a video released Friday shows her crying and kissing him.

REUTERS/Mike Segar/Files
Former Baltimore Ravens NFL running back Ray Rice (R) and his wife Janay arrive for a hearing at a New York City office building, in this November 5, 2014 file photo.

A video released Friday shows Ray Rice's then-fiancee crying and kissing him while they are both handcuffed and being taken to jail by police officers after Rice punched her in a casino elevator.

The video was obtained by ABC News through a public records request filed with the New Jersey Gaming Enforcement Division. Rice's attorney fought to keep the video from being released but lost.

The video shows Janay Palmer— now married to the former Baltimore Ravens running back — crying and being comforted by officers or security officials at the Revel casino early on the morning of Feb. 15.

An officer walked a handcuffed Rice toward an elevator, pulling Rice's sweatshirt hood over his head. Palmer, also handcuffed, appeared to be crying as another officer led her behind Rice.

Both of them were placed in an elevator with several officers. Rice and Palmer moved their heads together as if they were talking. Palmer leaned in and appeared to kiss Rice before they were escorted out of the elevator.

ABC said the total length of the video is about 45 minutes long. The network released excerpts that last about 2 1/2 minutes.

“This is a time of healing and he, quite naturally, doesn’t want another media showing of what must have been the worst event of his life,” Rice’s lawyer, Peter Ginsberg, told ABC News.  “What the media ought to be focusing on is the issue of domestic violence.”

TMZ first published video of Rice punching his then-fiancée unconscious and then dragged her out of the elevator at the Atlantic City casino. In September, a law enforcement official showed the Associated Press multiple videos from the casino the night Rice was arrested. Those videos included security cameras from inside and outside the elevator and two cell phone videos that included some audio as staff members and others tried to assist Palmer. None of the videos shown to the AP included the newly released footage obtained by ABC. The videos were shown to the AP on condition of anonymity because the official wasn't authorized to release them.

Rice was charged with assault, and entered an intervention program to have the charges dropped. Charges against Palmer were dropped for a lack of evidence.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell initially suspended Rice for two games. After the video of the punch became public, Goodell changed the suspension to indefinite and the Ravens released Rice.

An arbitrator later ruled in favor of Rice and threw out the indefinite suspension, freeing Rice to play again. No team has signed Rice and it's unclear if a team will take him on for next season.

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