Florida police break up high school prostitution ring

Students from two Florida high schools were involved in a prostitution ring, according to Venice Beach, Fla., police. One teen was arrested, and another arrest is expected Tuesday. 

 Authorities in Florida say a 17-year-old high school student organized a prostitution ring of students from nearby high schools.

The teen was arrested Friday on felony charges of human trafficking of a person under 18.

Police say at least one act of prostitution took place, which led to the arrest of 21-year-old John Michael Mosher. He's accused of paying $40 and a bottle of liquor to have sex with a 15-year-old girl.

Police Capt. Tom Mattmuller told the Sarasota Herald-Tribune another arrest is expected Tuesday.

Officials say the ring was uncovered when four students confided to administrators at Venice High School, reported the Herald-Tribune:

In early October, four female students approached Venice High administrators and said a male Venice High student and De Armas wanted them to join their prostitution ring, according to police documents.

Students told officers that De Armas coordinated at least three prostitution deals — including the one with the 15-year-old — by using Facebook private messaging.

After Mosher paid for the sex, the police reports said, De Armas and an accomplice began trying to recruit other girls to have sex with clients to gain money and alcohol. They planned to use some of the money to buy narcotics, according to witness statements to police.

Documents indicate the teen and at least one other student concocted the plan over the summer to prostitute teens for money and alcohol.

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