Dorm shooting at Delaware college injures one student

Delaware State University went on lockdown for three hours Monday, after a student was shot at a residence hall near the college.

Mark Mulligan / The Herald
Hours before a student was shot at a Delaware State University residence hall, Marysville Pilchuck High School students returned to class for the first time after the Oct. 24 shooting that has left four of their classmates dead.

A student was shot at a residence hall near Delaware State University on Monday, prompting police to lock down the campus for nearly three hours before determining the shooting was an isolated act of violence.

The victim, a male student, was taken to a local hospital with non-life-threatening injuries, said Kay Sass, Dover emergency management coordinator.

The shooting was reported shortly after 5 p.m. at the Living and Learning Commons, said Dover Police Cpl. Mark Hoffman, and the campus was put on lockdown about 5:30 p.m., university spokesman Carlos Holmes said. The residence hall, formerly a Sheraton hotel, is about a half-mile north of the campus.

Neither Sass nor Hoffman offered any description of the shooter, who remained at large late Monday.

Hoffman said police believe the shooting was an isolated incident. Sass said investigators "felt comfortable enough to lift the lockdown" shortly after 8 p.m.

Breanna Barber, 18, a freshman from Abingdon, Maryland, said she learned about the shooting about 6 p.m. when her instructor got an alert on her cellphone and told students.

Delaware State University is a historically black university. It has more than 4,100 full- and part-time students, more than half of whom live on campus.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.