Calif. wildfire growth slows, man faces arson charges

The wind-whipped wildfire had burned through 119 square miles of timber and vegetation east of Sacramento as of Friday morning and was just 10 percent contained but had yet to damage or destroy any homes or buildings, according to California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

Rich Pedroncelli/AP
A firefighter waters down a tree as flames approach a containment line, while fighting the King fire near Fresh Pond, Calif., Sept. 18. Authorities arrested Wayne Allen Huntsman, 37, Wednesday and has charged him with deliberately starting the Northern California wildfire that has burned more than 70,000 acres and is only 5 percent contained.

A wildfire that has driven some 2,800 people from their homes in California is growing but not as substantially as in previous days.

Fire officials say the blaze about 60 miles (100 kilometers) east of Sacramento had burned through 119 square miles (308 square kilometers) as of Friday morning, up about 5 square miles (13 square kilometers) from the previous day. It remains 10 percent contained.

The wind-whipped blaze more than doubled in size on Thursday, when it grew to 114 square miles (295 square kilometers). It is threatening 12,000 homes around the community of Pollock Pines, though there are no reports of any damage.

"There are a lot of firefighters saying that this fire is producing fire conditions unlike anything that they have ever seen," Cal Fire Battalion Chief Joe Tyler said at a community meeting Thursday night. "It's creating its own weather overhead. Just the tinder-dry fuel conditions are igniting fuels every time — brush or timber — every time an ember drops on the ground."

Wayne Allen Huntsman, 37, was being held Thursday night on $10 million bail in El Dorado County Jail and was scheduled to be arraigned on Friday.

Huntsman faces a forest-land arson charge, along with a special allegation of arson with aggravating factors because the blaze east of Sacramento put a dozen firefighters in serious danger, forcing them to deploy their fire shields. They all escaped unharmed.

District Attorney Vern Pierson declined to say what led investigators to Huntsman. Investigators were in contact with Hunstman before his arrest Wednesday night in Placerville.

"It's something that's evolving at this point," Pierson said of the investigation. He did not know whether Huntsman had an attorney.

Huntsman's sister, Tami Criswell, said she doubts her brother started the fire, but if he did, it wasn't on purpose. Criswell said she and her brother were raised in Santa Cruz and often camped. She said her brother, who has worked in construction and private security, loves being in the forest and always was cautious with campfires.

"He's a really good guy," Criswell said. "He would never do anything intentionally to hurt anybody."

Yet, Santa Cruz authorities have a $5,000 warrant out for Huntsman stemming from a Feb. 27, 2013, arrest for resisting or obstructing a public officer. Officials said he has failed to show up for several court dates.

His arrest record in Santa Cruz dates back to 1996, according to court records. That year he was convicted of tampering with a vehicle, auto theft, driving under the influence, grand theft and assault with a deadly weapon, which resulted in a three-year sentence. He was sent to San Quentin State Prison.

In 2003, he was convicted in Plumas County of receiving stolen property, the new complaint says.

The blaze, which started Saturday, has been fueled by heavy timber and grass that is extremely dry because of California's third straight year of drought. It is costing $5 million a day to fight, Cal Fire officials said.

Many of the 12,000 threatened homes were in Pollock Pines, 60 miles east of Sacramento.

Residents at an evacuation center said they were worried despite no home damages reported yet.

"We've been doing a lot of praying," said Sally Dykstra, who lives in a home in the middle of the fire area with her husband, Garry, 74, and her daughter, Stacie, 46.

Meanwhile, farther north in the town of Weed, 143 homes and nine other buildings, including churches, were destroyed according to final damage assessments released Thursday.

Residents were expected to be allowed to return to the burned areas once utility crews finished restoring power, water and telephone service.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.