Myrtle Beach shootings: Four different shootings leave 3 dead, 5 injured in beach town

The Myrtle Beach motel shooting that killed three and injured one made headlines Sunday, but Myrtle Beach police say three other shootings also took place over the holiday weekend.

Janet Blackmon Morgan/The Sun News/AP
Ocean Boulevard is closed to vehicle traffic for about eight blocks as Myrtle Beach Police investigate multiple shootings late Saturday, May 24.

Police in Myrtle Beach are investigating a shooting in a hotel room that left two people injured. It's the fourth shooting in two days at the popular South Carolina beach town over the Memorial Day weekend.

Police Capt. David Knipes said a man and a woman were shot around 10:30 p.m. Sunday at the Wave Rider Resort. The hotel is about 16 blocks south of the Bermuda Sands Motel where three people were killed and another injured in a shooting Saturday night.

Knipes says no arrests have been made, but detectives are working around the clock. He says every available officer is working because the Memorial Day weekend is already one of the beach's busiest times.

Police also reported shootings that each injured one person Saturday morning and Saturday night.

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