Erica Enders-Stevens captures Texas drag race title

Erica Enders-Stevens is a two-time winner on the National Hot Rod Association's circuit this year. Erica Enders-Stevens was victorious in Baytown, Texas, over the weekend.

Jerry Foss, NHRA/AP
In this photo submitted by the NHRA, Erica Enders-Stevens celebrates her first career win at Royal Purple Raceway located outside of her hometown of Houston, Sunday, April 27, 2014, in Baytown, Texas.

Erica Enders-Stevens raced to her second Pro Stock victory of the season Sunday in the NHRA SpringNationals, beating Allen Johnson in the final at Royal Purple Raceway.

Enders-Stevens had a 6.594-second pass at 210.60 mph in her Chevrolet Camaro, beating Johnson — 6.588 at 210.28 — with a better reaction time off the line.

"My team's been really awesome," said Enders-Stevens, also the winner last month in Las Vegas. "I've had a really consistent race car. That's what it takes Sundays, consistency. We had to make last second transmission change and go through the gears to make sure everything was right."

The victory was the 99th by a female driver in NHRA Mello Yello Drag Racing Series history.

Antron Brown won in Top Fuel, and Robert Hight topped the Funny Car field.

Racing in his fifth straight final, Hight ran a 4.055 at 314.90 in his Ford Mustang to beat Jack Beckman. Hight has three victories in the first six events this season. He opened a 122-point lead over owner and teammate John Force.

Brown raced to second straight win with a 3.793 pass at 317.72 against Khalid alBalooshi. Brown took over the Top Fuel points lead from Doug Kalitta.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.