Joe Biden: 'In my heart' could be president. Is that an announcement?

Vice President Joe Biden told NBC's 'Today Show' that he has not made a decision about running for president in 2016. But the door is open.

(AP Photo/Larry Downing, Pool)
President Barack Obama delivers the State of Union address before a joint session of Congress in the House chamber Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, in Washington, as Vice President Joe Biden listens.

 Vice President Joe Biden said Wednesday that "in my heart" he could be a good president.

But Biden emphasized, "I haven't made a decision to run and I haven't made a decision not to run."

Biden told NBC's "Today" show that he needs to focus on his current job. Asked on "CBS This Morning" whether his wife wants him to run, he replied, "Jill and I will make that decision later down the road."

In his appearance on NBC, Biden took issue with administration critics who say President Barack Obama suffered "a lost year" in terms of achieving, or even advancing, major policy goals such as an immigration overhaul or new gun control laws.

And Biden said that he likes former Defense Secretary Robert Gates, even though the Republican asserted in his new memoir that Biden had been wrong on practically every foreign policy and national security issue over the past 40 years.

"The fundamental problem here is that Bob Gates and I have disagreed on almost every major foreign policy issue since Vietnam," Biden said.

Biden also appeared on CBS This Morning, when asked if Hillary Clinton's decision to run or not, would affect his own, Biden said: "No, not directly. The only reason a man or woman should run for president -- and I'm sure Hillary views it the exact same way -- is if they think they're better positioned to be able to do what the nation needs at the moment. And what is the plan that you have for the country."

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