Chris Christie should step down as RGA chair, says Cuccinelli

Chris Christie 'does not serve the goals' of the Republican Governors' Association, says Ken Cuccinelli, who lost his race for governor of Virginia last fall.

Steve Helber/AP/File
Then-gubernatorial candidate Ken Cuccinelli, seen answering questions at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Va., in September 2013, has said that Chris Christie should step down as the chair of the Republican Governors' Association. He was one of the first Republican officials to suggest it, as Democrats probe abuse-of-power allegations in New Jersey.

A recent Republican gubernatorial candidate said Tuesday that "it makes sense" for New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie to step down as chairman of the Republican Governors Association.

Former Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli said on CNN's "Crossfire" that Christie "does not serve the goals" of the RGA by finishing the rest of his one-year term.

"From the perspective of setting aside this as an issue in other races, it makes sense for him to step aside in that role," said Cuccinelli, who lost Virginia's governor's race last fall.

He becomes one of the first Republican officials to suggest Christie step down while Democrats probe abuse-of-power allegations in New Jersey.

Christie's role with the RGA is seen as a significant stepping stone for a prospective presidential run, allowing him to strengthen his national network of Republican leaders and donors.

He traveled to Florida this weekend to raise money for Gov. Rick Scott. They did not appear together publicly.

Christie senior adviser Mike DuHaime said that Cuccinelli's comments are "disappointing, given the RGA was by far the largest single donor to his losing campaign, giving more than $8 million — a significant portion of which was raised by Gov. Christie."

DuHaime said on Friday that Christie "has received strong, positive feedback from his fellow governors and RGA donors alike and will remain RGA chairman."

Cuccinelli's remarks come the same day Christie formally began his second term as New Jersey governor.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.