I-55 bank robber caught? Andrew Maberry confesses to being 'I-55 bandit'

I-55 bank robber: The FBI announced Wednesday that Andrew Maberry was arrested and charged with bank robbery. He surrendered within a day of the FBIs's 'I-55 Bandit' publicity campaign.

Federal Bureau of Investigation/AP
Surveillance photos released by the FBI show a serial bank robber the FBI has dubbed the 'I-55 Bandit' in, from left: Hurricane, W.V., July 30, 2013; Arnold, Mo., July 2, 2013, and Bel Air, Md., on June 5, 2013. Some of the bank robberies occurred near Interstate 55 in Missouri, Illinois, Maryland, West Virginia and Tennessee.

A man suspected of robbing banks in five states has turned himself in to the FBI.

The FBI announced Wednesday that 19-year-old Andrew Maberry, of O'Fallon, Ill., was arrested and charged with one federal count of bank robbery in a July heist at Commerce Bank in the St. Louis suburb of Arnold. His surrender came less than 24 hours after the FBI started a publicity campaign and dubbed Maberry the "I-55 Bandit."

The FBI says Maberry is suspected of 10 robberies and attempts at two other banks since May in Illinois, Missouri, Maryland, West Virginia and Tennessee. Some of the crimes occurred near Interstate 55.

The crimes occurred at various bank branches. Three were in Jackson, Tenn. Three others were in the St. Louis-area towns of Arnold, Mo., Crystal City, Mo., and Belleville, Ill. Two were in Bel Air, Md.

Other towns where the robberies occurred included Cape Girardeau, Mo., Hurricane, W.Va., and the Maryland towns of Essex and Ocean City.

The FBI did not disclose the amount of money taken.

It wasn't immediately clear if Maberry had an attorney.

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