Fred White dies: Longtime Kansas City Royals announcer recently retired

Fred White dies: After spending time as the voice of Kansas State University athletics, Fred White moved into the Royals radio broadcast booth in 1973. Fred White is also remembered for his TV work as a college basketball play-by-play announcer.

Longtime Kansas City Royals broadcaster Fred White died Wednesday.

The Royals were informed of White's passing by his son, Joe. White died in hospice one day after the team announced his retirement after 40 years working for the organization.

White was the sports anchor for Topeka's WIBW-TV and broadcast Kansas State athletics before joining the Royals in 1973. He would work with Denny Matthews as their primary broadcasting through the 2008 season, when the team was well into its lengthy decline.

Over those 25 years, though, White helped call six division championships, an American League pennant in 1980 and the Royals' only World Series championship in 1985.

White also broadcast basketball games for ESPN and other networks. Upon leaving the broadcast booth, he headed up the Royals Radio Network and supervised the Royals Alumni, assisting with clinics, appearances and the team's fantasy camp.

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