NJ train explosive: Man accused of having explosive material on train

NJ train explosive: A New Jersey man has been charged with having improvised explosive material at his home and also bringing it onto a train earlier this month.

A Jersey City man was charged with having explosives material at his home and on a train just days before the Boston Marathon bombings, but authorities said there was no indication he planned to detonate the devices, the Jersey Journal reported on Thursday.

The article on the paper's website also said the man, Mykyta Panasenko, 27, was charged in New Jersey state court and released.

Jersey City police spokesman Stan Eason confirmed that Panasenko was charged but gave no further details.

Panasenko was charged with having at his home on April 5 two improvised explosive devices made from a cylinder containing the propellant powder Pyrodex, the newspaper reported.

He was also charged with recklessly creating widespread risk of injury or damage to a building by constructing the devices, and with having the explosives material on April 7 aboard a NJ Transit Train leaving Hoboken, New Jersey, and bound for Suffern, New York, the paper said.

A statement from unnamed law enforcement authorities said "there is no indication at this point of the investigation that he intended to detonate a device in his building or on the transit system," according to the paper.

"Police recovered components of an explosive device at his home, not a completed device," the statement said, according to the Jersey Journal. "However, the investigation revealed that he did transport completed devices from his home at some point."

The Boston Marathon bombings that killed thee people and wounded more than 264 others occurred on April 15, the same day authorities filed an initial charge against Panasenko, according to the paper, which did not cite any other connection between the two cases.

FBI Special Agent Barbara Woodruff referred inquiries regarding Panasenko to the Hudson County Prosecutor's office, which is handling the case. The US Attorney's office in Newark declined to comment and Panasenko could not be reached for comment.

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