Ashley Judd: Senate race for real?

Ashley Judd hints at Senate run in Kentucky. If Ashley Judd ran for Senate in 2014, she'd be up against Republican Sen. Mitch McConnell.

(Photo by Matt Sayles/Invision/AP)
Actress Ashley Judd says she's still considering a run for the US Senate. Judd and husband Dario Franchitti seen here at the Emmy Awards in Los Angeles last September.

Kentucky native Ashley Judd says she is "taking a close look" at running against Republican Sen. Mitch McConnell in 2014.

Judd, a Hollywood actress and activist, spoke briefly to The Courier-Journal on her way to the Kentucky Society of Washington's Bluegrass Ball on Saturday evening. Judd would not say whether she has decided to mount a campaign.

She said "the people of Kentucky need a fighter."

Judd has been mentioned as a potential Democratic challenger to McConnell, who is the Senate Minority Leader.

McConnell did not attend the Bluegrass Ball.

Judd said that "the people of Kentucky are interested in me representing them is the greatest honor of my life so far."

But as The Courier-Journal reports, Judd is opposed to mountain-top strip mining, in a state where candidates traditionally support coal mining.

This is not the first time the Judd has hinted that she might run. As The Christian Science Monitor wrote last month, Judd's name has been out there for a while.

"One reason Judd’s name is coming up is because other prominent Kentucky Democrats don’t want to run and get beat.

Second, Judd’s not just a Democrat, she’s a Hollywood Democrat. Her own grandmother recently called her a “Hollywood liberal.” The GOP has long experience in painting such folks as out-of-touch celebrity nitwits who want to nationalize health care while forcing everyone to drive electric cars with a top speed of 55 miles per hour."

___

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.