New York City: Suspect held in subway death

Police say the man who was killed by a New York City subway on Monday may have been pushed. They say the alleged attacker may have been mentally unstable. 

AP Photo/Mark Lennihan
Uniformed and plainclothes police officers stand outside a New York subway station after a man was killed after falling into the path of a train, Monday. Transit officials say police are investigating whether he could have been pushed onto the tracks.

Police held a suspect for questioning Tuesday to see if he may be the person who pushed a 58-year-old man onto a New York City subway track where he was killed by a train on Monday.

The train crushed Ki-Suck Han in front of horrified commuters after he was shoved onto the track as the southbound Q subway pulled into the station at 49th Street near Times Square.

The assailant's image was captured on subway security cameras.

"We have an individual we're questioning that resembles the individual captured in the video. He was taken into custody by detectives who were canvassing video and found an image that resembled this individual at the vicinity of 50th Street and Seventh Avenue," police spokesman Paul Browne said. "He's being questioned now."

Police were preparing line-ups for witnesses of the subway attack to confirm the identify of the suspect, Browne said.

Witnesses saw the suspect talking to himself before the altercation, leading to suspicion he may have been mentally disturbed, police said.

(Reporting by Chris Francescani; Editing by Daniel Trotta and Philip Barbara)

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.